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Mace

Quick Overview

Nutmeg and mace have similar sensory qualities, with nutmeg having a slightly sweeter and mace a more delicate flavor. Mace is often preferred in light dishes for the bright orange, saffron-like hue it imparts.

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Details

Mace is the covering of the nutmeg seed. Nutmeg, which is wrapped in a bright red lacy covering called Mace. Both the Nutmeg and Mace have their own distinct flavors. Nutmeg is about 3/4 to 1 inch long and oval shaped with a flavor resembling that of Cardamom, Cinnamon, and Cloves. Both Nutmeg and Mace have a long history in Asian cooking.

Additional Information

Common Uses Potato dishes, processed meat products, soups, sauces, baked goods, also commonly used in rice pudding.
History

Nutmeg is known to have been a prized and costly spice in European medieval cuisine as a flavoring, medicinal, and preservative agent. Saint Theodore the Studite (c. 758 – 826) allowed his monks to sprinkle nutmeg on their Pease pudding when required to eat it. In Elizabethan times, because nutmeg was believed to ward off the plague, demand increased and its price skyrocketed.

Nutmeg was known as a valuable commodity by Muslim sailors from the port of Basra (including the fictional character Sinbad the Sailor in the One Thousand and One Nights). Nutmeg was traded by Arabs during the Middle Ages and sold to the Venetians for high prices, but the traders did not divulge the exact location of their source in the profitable Indian Ocean trade, and no European was able to deduce its location.

Region(s) No
Ingredients Mace
Product of:
Organic No