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No. 230 - Horseradish Powder

Quick Overview

Horseradish Powder provides a concentrated form of the root plant, convenient for adding its intense, pungent and hot flavor to any recipe.

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Details

Horseradish is native to regions along the Caspian Sea from Russia to Finland, and is now grown in northern parts of both Europe and the United States. The volatile oil that gives horseradish its bite evaporates while cooking, reducing its pungency. This is why you usually find horseradish called for in uncooked sauces.

Additional Information

Common Uses To make horseradish sauce, mix 1 part powder with 2 parts water, using more or less water for desired thickness. For mustard, mix together equal parts powdered horseradish, mustard powder and vinegar. For cocktail sauce, simply mix 2 tbsp. powder with 1 cup ketchup. It’s a zesty addition to dips, sour cream, tomato juice and Bloody Marys.
History

Horseradish is probably indigenous to temperate Eastern Europe, where its Slavic name chren seemed to Augustin Pyramus de Candolle more primitive than any Western synonym. Horseradish has been cultivated since antiquity. According to Greek mythology, the Delphic Oracle told Apollo that the horseradish was worth its weight in gold. Horseradish is probably the plant mentioned by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History under the name of Amoracia, and recommended by him for its medicinal qualities, and possibly the wild radish, or raphanos agrios of the Greeks. The early Renaissance herbalists Pietro Andrea Mattioli and John Gerard showed it under Raphanus.

Both root and leaves were used as a medicine during the Middle Ages and the root was used as a condiment on meats in Germany, Scandinavia, and Britain. It was introduced to North America during European colonialization; both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson mention horseradish in garden accounts.

Region(s) No
Ingredients Horseradish
Product of:
Organic No